Poetry Review: Erik Fuhrer – Not Human Enough for the Census (Vegetarian Alcoholic Press)

Not Human Enough for the Census, by Erik Fuhrer is a poetry collection that dips into nightmares, netherworlds, and fantasies. However, there is a remarkable truth that shines through. The references to the uncanny are grounded in realism. Perhaps the text offers us escapism?

When I read, ‘mask of feathers’ and ‘my other face’ in the first poem of the collection, I noted how we are invited to look at the writings as something otherworldly perhaps, ‘not quite human’. Fuhrer goes as far as saying that the ‘world has ended already’. However, the lines, ‘a finger/ that I cut/ out from an origami flower/ with a stem that went on forever’ display an unrestrained beauty that is to be found throughout. This is edgy, prickly poetry. It is barbed, and filled with images akin to nightmares, ‘rat gnawing at/ the glass of your nightmare’.

Fuhrer is constantly shifting our attention across the page – in a rejection of form and structure that strengthens the otherworldliness. However, this is contrary to the images of ‘slugs/ and worms and apples/ and pears…’ By working with the grimy and earthy the poet roots their work, in the familiar, and this is only heightened by the polysyndeton.

We are encouraged to imagine. This is a collection that errs on the edge of normalcy, of the known and presents us with hugely evocative and unexplainable images, ‘now the tree that grows/ between my teeth/ is an infinitely splitting atom’

It would be remiss of me, to consider the collection without giving due consideration to the accompanying artwork by Kimberly Androlowicz, which is equally strong, striking, and evocative. Some of the images have the appearance of rudimental cave paintings. The pairing of artists is complimentary in both directions. The use of colour is bold, and raw, but definitely not amateur. Indeed, the images provide a landscape for these texts. I personally like to read poetry that has a sense of place, and though this poetry is at times unearthly, the landscapes ground it.

This has a feeling throughout that it is as much about creation, as it is about destruction. The work is as much about new beginnings, as it is about death and endings. This is perhaps, furthered in the poems that deal with splitting of carbon atoms and blood, ‘god is liquid in the tempest’.

If one is looking for commonalities between the poems, they are there. This is poetry that stimulates, and whisks you from striking image to striking image. Poetry about blood, and skin cells, about life and being. Prepare to be challenged. There is nothing ordinary about this work. These are poems ‘with holes/ without lungs/ without breath/ without body’.

There is a playfulness in shroom destruction; a waggishness that cuts through some of the difficult language and form. And, in a chanwinked spider, I find the beauty that I am looking for within a collection, and this is for me, the standout text, ‘in the swipe of/ glittering/ slips/ the wire/ onto my body/ as I/ sling/ the cockroach anthem/ to the wind’. Here, in this pithy text, the poet showcases all of their talents: surprising and creative language use; powerful, evocative imagery; and experimental form. That it is brief and perhaps mirrors my style of writing is not lost on me. We like what we like.

I think my favourite lines from the whole collection are the following, they display an attitude, that this poet is going to do things their own way, ‘the answer has the heart of a black hole/ leave it the fuck alone’. If I was going to make comparisons between poets, then there is certainly something of Stuart Buck here, in the otherworldliness and frankness of these texts.

thresholds is a fine example of poetry tiptoeing between the fantastic and the real. Certainly, it is, ‘a knitted masterpiece tucked beneath his ears that would usher in his demise/ as a human and resurrection as the world’s most realistic mannequin’.

The deeper into the text you wander, the more at home with it you become. By the time I reached, all filiation is imaginary, I had developed a relationship with the poetry that went beyond mere reading for purposes of review; I was reading it because I was enjoying it. Wholeheartedly! Indeed, there is a genuine, sparse beauty in, ‘becoming fish/ gilled heart/ gilded tongue/ a spider RANSACKING/ the/ web/ of/ my throat’. This collection from Fuhrer is certainly worth your time and attention.

This collection is available here.

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