Mick Ferry – Interview

Mick Ferry is renowned as a fine purveyor of lugubrious surrealism and has quickly established himself as one of the most sought after comics on the British and International comedy circuit. One of the finest comperes around, Mick Ferry performs regularly at The Comedy Store in London and Manchester as well as headlining at comedy venues nationwide. He is also a regular member of the prestigious topical Cutting Edge Team at the Comedy Store.

On our TV screens, Mick has recently starred in BBC One`s Michael McIntyre’s Comedy Roadshow as well as Comedy Blue and The Comedy Store for Comedy Central. He made his big screen debut in 2009 in Ken Loach’s Looking For Eric – a hit feature film at the Cannes film festival where it was nominated for the prestigious Palm D’Or. A prolific writer, Mick was a writer on John Bishop’s Britain for BBC One and has also previously written for BBC3`s Smalltime.

Mick made his debut at the Edinburgh Comedy Festival in 2009 performing The Comedy Final at the Gilded Balloon. He returned in 2010 with a brand new show The Missing Chippendale (Body Issues) to great critical acclaim.

With lockdown sort of having been and gone, and now with it being on the horizon again, how have you been coping? Have you started learning Mandarin or begun baking?
There was a plan like a lot people to learn another language. I download the app and did fuck all of with it. I kept myself busy, doing little sketches. Writing material. The usual things you are supposed to do. As for the mood during lockdown, I was like, everybody else, one day, you’re okay, and the day after you sort of glad you’ve not got access to a shotgun because not sure whether you’d use it on yourself, or actually strangers. So, those kinds of moods.


Have you done any of that type of writing before? Have you explored writing sketches et cetera?
Yeah. I’ve done that before – I’ve done that loads of times. I have written for other people. It was something to concentrate myself and basically, you know, stop myself going insane. My job, the industry I work in (stand-up), has gone. It just disappeared and looks like it’s disappearing again. So, I think just to remain creative was important.


It looked like you had the family involved too, were they all happily on board?
They are sort of used to my idiosyncrasies anyway. They know what I am like. They know that I’m a bit of a loon.


You mention that you have been writing material, is much of it COVID related or have you tried to put some distance between yourself and that?
Of course, you would be a loon not to mention COVID. You don’t want to talk about it too much, but I would be quite worried if I met someone in the street now and we had an hour’s conversation, and they did not mention once, the things that have gone on this year. I would worry about that. I would worry about their mental health. I would actually be quite jealous that they have forgotten about it that easily. You have got to mention it. You have got to mention the circumstances you are in, and create your unique perspective for all of us, all of mankind really. Let’s be honest. It is something we have never been through before. And it is something we have all suffered at the same time, and are suffering!


Because it is in our collective conscience…?
Yeah. Exactly. Of everybody you ask around the world, nobody has been sleeping properly, have they? Experiencing weird nightmares, and all that bullshit. I imagine that’s all anxiety driven.


Quite possibly. Just being out of routine and not being as active has hurt people. You are right to document it. Although, as much as much as you can write about it now, your opportunities to deliver that material are limited
Exactly!


Have you anything that you would explicitly want to say to Johnson and those handling the situation?
Yeah, but you know what? What is the point? The man is a tool. The people behind the government are tools. Look, they have spent £12 billion on a track and trace system that does not work. That tells you everything you need to know! They have an advisor who broke the rules that he explicitly helped to lay down – he drove to Barnard Castle. So, anything that Johnson has got to say, I have no interest in whatsoever. He is just a haunted landscape! An ex-Eton schoolboy. Somebody better than me pointed out that PM’s that go to Eton, don’t make good leaders. It has been proven time and time again. They have no grasp on reality. He has ignored every piece of advice he has been given. At the start of it he suggested herd mentality and he went around shaking everybody’s hands and he got the disease – the daft sod. So, I have nothing to say to them. He is not a man I would talk to personally. Johnson has history – he despises the working classes – we’re treated, as usual by the elite as cannon fodder. As Andy Burnham said, when it comes to economics, the North of England has always been used as an economic canary, we are always the ones that suffer first. So, there is a disconnect and I am hoping the only thing that comes out of this is that we end up with a North West assembly. The idea was piloted in the 1990s. Anthony H. Wilson – God rest his soul – was well behind the idea but it didn’t happen. But I have a feeling that when we come out of this, if somebody mentions the North West assembly again and a bit of autonomy for our own region. Then we will go for it.


It is an interesting concept. I mean, there is a lot of bad blood between certain places in the North West – Liverpool and Manchester notably. But this type of thing draws people together. As much as it pushes others away – that is to say, as much as you do not want to speak to Johnson or anybody down in London, you are willing, to openly embrace those closest to you and work with them.
Of course, it’s the only way. We’ve got to realise that we’re the potential to be an economic powerbase ourselves, driven by Manchester and Liverpool. People have got to understand that. We have got a good economy ourselves, but we are totally controlled by the South. Why? That should not be happening. Let’s put borders up! I seriously would, we need autonomy. We need to be looking after our own affairs up here now. Andy Burnham was describing that, and the Mayor of Liverpool, who seems a good lad as well. I think it will happen, and I don’t think we’ll be the only region.


My wife is Cornish and they have been speaking about independence down there for an awful long time.
I think the Welsh will go for full independence after Scotland too. I can see a breakup happening. It’s because of constant cases of the bumbling of our economic affairs. It gives you a bit of a complex, you wonder am I being correct here? But if you look at history, it’s the North that gets a kicking before anywhere else. After we come through this, I think there will be changes, massive changes!


If you were to retrain as suggested, what could you see yourself doing?
I used to be an upholsterer. But I couldn’t go back to that. I am not physically fit enough to do that now. I mean, I am 52. I would have to get myself in shape before I could do that again. Retrain? I don’t know if there is anything I could retrain as. I have been doing this for 20 years now – I don’t know what I’d do, or what I’d be capable of doing.


You have such a natural demeanour onstage; I am surprised to hear that you ever did anything else!
The trick is making it look like you are not doing it – making it look easy. I think that is a skill in any performance art; to make it look like it comes naturally. It takes time for you to be able to do that. I don’t know what I’d retrain as, because let’s be honest, what industry is going to be left after this?


I would like to go back to point about autonomy in the North, because prior to COVID, the creative industry was flourishing. So, there is certainly scope there, for cities like Liverpool and Manchester and beyond to create something for themselves.
Definitely. It is a big, creative area. I have met people from all over the world, who have moved to Manchester because they want to make it in the music business. You do not have to be in London anymore. You come to the North West if you want to make it in the music business. That is something that has changed. You have only got to look at the success of both cities when it comes to music.


Indeed, we have BIMM in Manchester and LIPA in Liverpool that are well-established now.
Exactly and there’s well-established comedy clubs and a well-established comedy scene which is actually full of new comics. There is an established open-mic circuit in the North West too. It’s all there, for everybody. Even the BBC is in Manchester for fuck’s sake. We should make the most of that. We’ll have autonomy and we’ll hijack BBC! Get them to make unbiased TV shows, that would be quite nice.


Why not? Changing direction, I am interested in the discourse of stand-up comedy. What people are allowed to say on stage and whether they feel restrained by themselves, by society, by what country they are performing in even? How might comics change their shows accordingly?
Yeah. You do. I mean, performing overseas or in certain countries there are certain rules when it comes to libel, slander, and things dictated by religion and so on. So, you would be a fool not to break them. You would lose your work; you would lose your income. You are not dumbing it down. You are not sacrificing your integrity doing that. People talk about freedom of speech. Freedom of speech is still there. When people say, ‘you can’t say anything anymore’ – you can. But you have got to be prepared for the consequences. That is something we have always been responsible for. If you want to say something, you should have a think, ‘will this really upset somebody?’ – like a marginalized section of a society, you have to ask yourself why you are saying it, even if you really want to say it. Do not be saying ‘I can’t say what I want to say.’ – you just said it and before are angry with what you said. So, you either own it and accept that, or you filter yourself.


Would you agree that stand-up is a pure art form?
Yes. Of course, it is.


I am glad you’ve said that. You have been doing this twenty years now, is that purity important to you, beyond it just being a job that pays the bills?
Listen, things can be said off the cuff and, in the moment, there is something unique about doing it live, that you cannot get when you see recordings back. Things can happen in a room that a live audience then gets. It could be a bit of teasing of somebody, and because of something that’s gone on before, everybody knows exactly why I have said what I have said. But that can be taken out of context then. Somebody could just record that moment and show it, ‘Look at this guy, he’s a right fucking dick!’ Live performance, that’s where the artform is. TV does not come across as an art form. We (us comics) know we’re still not officially recognized as artists, but let me tell you something… Say a theatre is beginning to struggle and needs to raise money fast, the first night they put on is a comedy night. Why? Because it always sells out. But they can fuck off, them wankers. You either recognise it as an art form, or you don’t! I quite like the idea of being an underground art movement. Why not? Let’s be part of that, let’s be part of something. Getting back to the question though, stand-up is a skill, it requires ability. You get found out quickly if you can’t do it! It takes time and it takes practice, like all art forms. It takes commitment to reach that sort of competent level, you know. Just like acting – just like singing. It is performance! It’s much more than repeating lines.


I am sort of loathed to ask you about this, but maybe folk will expect it? What is your best/worst gig experience?
Well, I have had plenty of good gigs. But I will tell you this, the adrenaline rush gets shorter and shorter. A good gig does not live that long, and you just need to get back onstage again. As bad gigs go… This sums up the new world we are living in. During lockdown, there has been a few gigs I’ve done online as streams to an audience. For some of these gigs, people pay extra to be front row, so you can see them on your screen. Anyway, this happened to me during one of these gigs. You know doing live stand-up, I have been sworn at; I’ve been threatened on stage; I’ve had a gang of men wait for me to finish once, wanting to fight me; I’ve had an ashtray thrown at me at a gig in Plymouth. I have had all sorts – everything you can contend with, but it’s water of a duck’s back now. But, nothing prepares you for doing a gig that’s being streamed when you’re in your own living room, and you can see your front row, for watching a woman, get up in the middle of your routine to go make herself a cup of tea, because she’s clearly not interested in what you’ve got to say. That was devastating!


That is some heckle! I wonder, what do you miss most about performance? Is it that adrenaline rush? You say they are getting shorter and shorter, or is it just the interaction and being out and about with people?
It’s the interaction! It is being out and about. It is a social thing, stand-up. You are with people, and you are also with other comics in the dressing room. There is a camaraderie. If you take that away – well… Sure, it can be lonely travelling around, but you have always got that group of people in front of you, your audience for however long you are onstage. They are your mates. That is who you are with. So, that is what you miss – that social aspect.


It is only reasonable that you would miss that when it has been taken away from you.
What do you do on a night off?
I watch a lot of stand-up! I am a fan of it, massively. You’ll often find me on a night off in a comedy club. That is what I do!
What is the purpose of that? Are you wanting to be entertained or are you wanting to improve your craft?
Yeah. It is the different styles that we all have. A lot of comics are very different to each other. I have several comedian mates that that have always made me laugh that I’ll always go along and watch when they’re in town and I’m not working, and of course there are new people that are breaking through all the time.


I read recently that you had been compared you to Les Dawson. Do you think that is fair?
I got described once as being lugubrious. It’s because of my grumpy looking face. I am nothing like Les Dawson. I am not as good as he was either. He was a fucking genius. I think that it was just a physical description, and nothing to do with material.


You don’t even play piano, Mick?
No, I don’t even play piano. It can be annoying with all forms of entertainment. When people want to say what a band sounds like, and people do it with stand-ups as well. I think.


I know that you are reticent to be labelled, but for people who may be unfamiliar with your work, who might YOU compare your style with? Are you more than an observational comic?
Oh man. I don’t know. I can’t really answer that question. Describe what I do? I think I’m funny. I know I am funny! I know it works. I know that sounds arrogant, but to be a stand-up there has to be a bit of arrogance there. It is not just observational stuff I do. There is all sorts going on in my shows. I will do one-liners, surreal stuff, observational stuff, family stuff, anything really. If I am emceeing, I probably won’t use any material, I will just be working with the audience or improvising. I’m not sure I’m comfortable answering that to be honest, the only thing I can say is come and see me!


My apologies. I suppose, really, it is for other people to draw their own conclusions.
The only thing I would say is that people should come and see me and form their own opinion. I get laziness from people who say, ‘You’re like Peter Kay.’ And it is just because of the accent because I’m nothing like Peter Kay. My act is nothing like his. You know what I mean? That is just what people do. So yeah. I don’t know how I would describe myself. Come and watch me!


What was the last book you read or record you bought?
The last record I bought was on vinyl, a Northern Soul collection. Musically, I think I have quite an eclectic taste. The last book I read? You know, I don’t remember. I go through spurts of reading, but it has been probably a couple of years since I last read a book. I know that sounds ridiculous. But then, next year I might read fucking hundreds. Oh, I did read this book about The Smiths. Yeah, a book about the meaning of all The Smiths’ songs or something. I think that was the last thing I read.


I think maybe we will end with something a bit silly… when I interviewed Paul Foot, I asked him where he bought his ties. So, in that vein, I would like to know, where do you buy your shoes?
There is an online company called Delicious Junction. The guy who owns that used to be the chief shoe designer for a shoe company called Icon.


I had Icon school shoes!
Yeah? He is making his own shoes, they’re really good! Or, if you have got a bit of cash to spare, Loakes, they may brilliant loafers and brogues. I buy too many shoes, or I did do! cannot afford them now!


Mick, what’s next for you?

I’m lucky enough to be a part of a new Radio4 series called, The Likely Dads, hosted by Tim Vincent. Myself and Russell Kane are the regular guests and each week we are joined by other dads to discuss ‘being a dad’. Quite a few celebrity dads make an appearance. The show is irreverent and informative at the same time. The first show went out at 23.00 on Thursday, 29th October. There are eight weekly episodes.

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Forgotten TV: Saxondale

Originally published on Planet Slop

As Steve Coogan returns to our screens as the insufferable Alan Partridge, Alan Parry looks back fondly at one of his less remembered characters, Tommy Saxondale. 

Steve Coogan is returning to the BBC this month in a brand-new, highly-anticipated Alan Partridge series, and we are more than excited by the news. However, we wanted to have a closer look at another of his projects.

Coogan, of course, has portrayed a whole host of other personas in his time, each of which is brilliantly funny in its own right. But, owing to the success of Partridge and the subsequent demand for more of the same, some of his other work has passed under the radar. One example, which I’m going to take as my focus here, is Saxondale.

Penned by Coogan and sometime collaborator Neil Maclennan, this was a sitcom centred around ex-roadie Tommy Saxondale, who struggles with both an anger management problem, and leaving his previous adrenaline-fuelled, rebellious lifestyle behind. For many years people have spoken about the decline of rock music, and Coogan encapsulates the much-maligned, die-hard dinosaurs of rock with a startling accuracy here. Struggling with no longer being cool or relevant, its no wonder that Tommy has such pent-up aggression, which is most apparent in his officious attitude towards pest control.

But, just because we all know an outmoded rocker or two, does not mean that Tommy is merely a one-dimensional caricature. Simply put, he’s not. While this aspect of his personality is front and centre, there is more going on. For example, Tommy shows off his nurturing skills when he takes a young assistant under his wing, offering him both work and board.

The assistant, Raymond is portrayed by Rasmus Hardiker (Lead Balloon), and he’s offered Tommy’s own brand of life-guidance. This unlikely, quasi-father figure and his counterpoised girlfriend Magz, played by the brilliant Ruth Jones (Gavin and Stacey, A Child’s Christmases in Wales) help the youngster find his feet. And in turn he shows Tommy that there is a way to find genuine pleasure in more low-octane pursuits.

We know that Tommy has been hurt by an unpleasant divorce, and he is obviously unsure of how to process his emotions, so together Raymond and Magz offer him a tenderness which he has clearly been lacking. In this sense it’s a love story, although, it can get a bit kinky at times.

Coogan’s character is a free thinker, and regularly says what’s on his mind, even if it’s not the best time to do so. In this way, the writing team are seemingly holding up a mirror to the wider world. They appear to be saying that strongly held beliefs should be given thorough consideration before being aired publicly, otherwise you can make a right tit of yourself. And perhaps Tommy’s relationship with Morwenna Banks’ Vicky, serves only to prove how difficult it is to get on in life if you are constantly prickly. It maybe that I’m getting a little deep here, because for all this conjecture, the laughs come thick and fast, and they’re not particularly sophisticated.

In conclusion, because they are each portrayed by Coogan, its extremely difficult to separate this from Alan Partridge. But is it fair to judge his other personas against his magnum opus? Probably not. Partridge will be remembered alongside David Brent, Basil Fawlty, Victor Meldrew, Hyacinth Bucket and Captain Mainwaring, as an absolute classic British sitcom character.

But, Saxondale is certainly deserving of attention in its own right. One should remember that at that time the BBC and others were putting out some real tripe, and the resonance of The Office hadn’t truly hit home. It’s not an exercise in subtle humour per se. And nor is it in-your-face in the way that The Thick of It is.

But, is it worth revisiting? Definitely! And my reasons are pretty simple, its well-balanced, and hasn’t aged prematurely. Further, it has a superb cast. But, more than anything, the sort of ill-tempered fossil that Tommy represents, is plenty deserving of the burlesque to which he is treated.

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Paul Foot Interview: “What if Spiderman was a right bigot?”

Originally posted on Planet Slop

Alan Parry quizzes comedian Paul Foot on his wacky inspiration, ties, politics, piglets and more.

Paul Foot brings his extraordinary brand of comedy to Liverpool on Thursday 9th November.

The show, ‘Tis a Pity She’s a Piglet had moderate success at last year’s Edinburgh Festival, but a prolonged worldwide tour has provided Foot with the opportunity to hone the material and this year’s reception was far kinder. In this interview, I ask about Paul’s inspiration for his brand of surreal and consider how he positions himself within his contemporaries.

Comedy of this nature is certainly going to divide opinion, but Foot has a loyal following whom he refers to not as fans, but as connoisseurs. An audience who have paid to see him fully understands that his material is not intended to be cutting edge, or breaking down any boundaries; its simply engineered to make you laugh.

Foot could be said to find the funny where many wouldn’t dare to even look, but it would be unfair to describe him as nothing more than an eccentric. His rigorous touring and commitment to reworking and writing new material proves there is much more to him than his renowned wild movements and unique hair style.

PSWho, or what was it that drew you to comedy in the first place? And which comedians, past or present, do you admire?

PF: I was drawn to comedy by accident. I was at university and there was a student comedy night coming up, some friends of mine said that I was funny and should sign up to do it, and I agreed. However, I had never seen stand-up comedy before ever, so I didn’t really know what it was. I didn’t know, for example, that comedians tend to prepare their performance/write material beforehand. So when the moment came I just went up and made up a load of stuff about fruit, asking about audience members’ favourite fruit and improvising from there. It went pretty well, and I knew from that moment that I would do comedy for the rest of my life.

In response to the second part of your question, my favourite comedian is Brian Gittins. He is excellent, and also present. I love his comedy.

PS: Similarly, are there any up and coming comedians, new to the circuit who you would advise us to keep an eye on?

PF: I very much enjoy the comedian Malcolm Head. He does comedy poems which are top quality. He sometimes is my support act for my shows when I tour; in fact, ye will see him perform if ye come to my upcoming shows.

PS: Have you always made people laugh?

PF: I have, and not always when I want them to laugh. Sometimes I try to be a very serious businessman, and people just laugh. Filing my tax return with Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs is a friggin’ nightmare; they just won’t stop laughing. Maybe it is my fault for keeping all my receipts filed meticulously inside a to-scale replica of the Mary Rose, and arriving in full Henry VIII regalia, including authentic 16th Century obesity jacket.

PS: What do you wish you knew when you started out in comedy?

PF: I wish I’d known that, one day, I would be successful. Nowadays, weird and surreal comedy is quite popular, but when I started out I was one of the only weird ones, and no one wanted the weird comedy. I was spectacularly unsuccessful for about 14.3 years, earning no money and getting booed off stages. And it was very difficult, but I stuck to my instincts, and one day, after 14.3 years I became an overnight success. It would have been nice to know in those long years that it would all be OK one day.

PS: You have something of a cult following, have you made efforts to whittle down your audience in a similar way to Daniel Kitson, or is this perhaps more closely related to your style? That is to say, do you think your comedy translates easily for the more casual comedy fan?

PF: I have made no efforts to whittle down my audience, nor to manipulate their make-up in any other way. I just create the comedy that comes naturally to me, and that seems to have gained an audience who appreciate it. And that has been expanding for the past 9.37 years. I do think my comedy translates to the more casual comedy fan, especially this latest show, which even contains tropical humour about the tropical subjects of the day, like what would happen if Spiderman was a right bigot, and terrorism et cetera. There’s loads of stuff to interest the casual comedy consumer.

PS: From the outside, it very much feels like the comedy we are shown has been through a process of sanitization and as a result many of the familiar faces are a product of this. How do you feel about the live comedy which is regularly broadcast to the masses on prime time television?

PF: I actually tend not to watch comedy on television, so I don’t really know what is being broadcast to the masses. The only things I watch on television are murder mystery shows, horse racing and Dragon’s Den, which is HILARIOUS. I especially love it when someone has come up with an utterly useless invention, and then it becomes clear that they have poured hundreds of thousands of pounds of their own money into it; they’ve remortgaged their house, spent their aged parents’ pensions, absolutely obliterated their childrens’ chances of going to university, and the dragons beg them to pack it in. But they never do! They always say, “Those dragons will regret it when I’m earning billions and every household in Britain loves my special plastic lid for the ends of half-eaten cucumbers!”

One of the things I have noticed, though, is that the comedy you get on television tends to be the sort of comedy that couldn’t possibly offend anyone, which is often not the most exciting comedy. Frankie Boyle, for example, who is a brilliant comedian, was sent away from television for ages because he made a joke about the private parts of our queen, Elizabeth Regina.

PS: You have an extraordinary ability to create hugely funny sets based on topics many may never consider an area for comedy. How do you come up with these ideas?

PF: What? People don’t think the dwindling numbers of Shire horses is an area for comedy? I thought everyone laughed at stuff like that. I guess the ideas just come from seeing a Shire Horse, or ordering a Chinese takeaway, or taking a walk by a pond. All sorts of ways.

PS: Your loyal connoisseurs are clearly prepared to seek you out, and consequently know, to an extent what they are going to get from you. That is, a very funny, although somewhat surreal evening. Bearing this in mind, do you find yourself testing their limits? Are they prepared for you to push them a little further?

PF: I do not mindfully ‘test the limits’ of any audience. It is not a case of pushing them as far as they can go, rather I just do the comedy I find funny, that I love to create, and I guess that tends to push the limits of comedy. But to me, comedy is not about pushing limits or always searching for new ways to make people laugh. It is simply about being very, very funny, and about communicating with people, and about saying something that resounds with people. Having said that, my audience do always seem willing for a right stretching.

PS: How do you try out your new material?

PF: I often try out my new material at my Secret Shows first. So the top Connoisseurs of my comedy see it first. And then I try out the comedy at various shows I do around the country. I eventually premier the new completed show at the Edinburgh Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland, Sturgeon.

PS: How much does the political landscape influence your act?

PF: It is difficult to say. I am not quite sure myself whether it is quite a lot or not at all. Political subjects seem to manifest themselves in my act, such as homophobia, misogyny, racism, religion, farming et cetera, because the people within those subjects are hilarious and I think it’s important to laugh at them. But I’m not particularly interested in the party political landscape, in relation to my act that is. I love laughing about all the losers in Parliament in my spare thyme. Poor old Nicky Clegg, and Terrorisa May, and Timothy Farron, who had to step down because he found being leader of a political party incompatible with being secretly homophobic. Absolutely top quality!

PS: Do you notice any differences in audiences around the country?

PF: Not really. I find that, wherever I do a show, the people that come to see me are very plugged in and sophisticated. They know what to expect and they come to see the surreal humour. The shows are always wonderful and filled with top quality people.

PS: To what extent do you improvise in your performances?

PF: It depends which performances. My tour shows are very carefully planned and executed, even if they don’t look that way. But when I do my Secret Shows for my Connoisseurs, I sometimes improvise the whole show, for 2.4 hours.

PS: Where do you buy your ties?

PF: Duchamp in London. They have excellent ties.

PS: How did you settle on the name ‘Tis A Pity She’s A Piglet’ for this tour?

PF: I saw a piglet, and I thought it was a pity she were a piglet and not a person. People have slightly better lives than piglets do. All that mud. I can’t bear to think of it.

PS: What can audiences expect from it?

PF: I don’t know. I don’t even know what to expect from it. It’s half surreal, half silly, and half hard-hitting satire…and one third trout.

PS: Has writing begun on your next show, and what do you have planned post tour?

Writing has begun on my next show. It started last year in the month of Novella on a trip to Madeira, and now it is in full flow. And I am going away again, after this tour finishes in the month of Decadence, to Australia to complete the writing, and the show will premier in the Edinburgh Festival next Augustus. Watch this space baybayyyy! I have never understood that phrase. What space? The final friggin’ frontier? It’s such an Americanism. I despise myself for writing it.

PS: How would you describe your sense of humour?

PF: I mainly laugh at wedding cakes falling over, or newsreaders messing up. I love it when weddings go wrong though. That’s the funniest thing in the whole universe.

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