Poetry Review: Serge Neptune – These Queer Merboys (Broken Sleep Books)

Serge   Neptune is a London-based merman, poet, and translator. He is a former Faber Academy student and his work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Lighthouse, Banshee, Brittle Star, Ink Sweat & Tears and Strange Poetry.

These Queer Merboys by Serge Neptune is a poetry collection swept in by the tide, that surprises with beautiful and striking imagery right from the off, ‘the sky is a ceiling of white paper cuts’.

What I find most affecting about this hoard of poems is the how they are brimming with the writer’s honesty and bravery, perhaps most evident in the title poem, which puts forward the truth that, ‘bodies have uses   other than swimming/ if caught in fishnets   things could happen’.

One assumes that there is no more a positive assurance in this text than, ‘the scars left were many and they burned for days’. The themes of sexuality and maturation are at the forefront of everything the poet does here. However, they are handled carefully throughout, ‘When we come of age, she imposed on us the burden of beauty’ – which is only furthered by, ‘freedom made them rainbow-feathered birds/ that leap from rose to lily without a care.’

As a whole, the poems serve as a extended metaphor for the difficulties surrounding sexuality. Indeed, these mermen come forth from the water to the land as those in the LGBTQIA+ community come forth from the shadows into the light. It is then, a display of courage and strength and calls to question non-believers and oppressors. As an ally, I felt a severe discomfort reading the line, ‘The telly blasting SINNERS! SINNERS!’

This collection delivers as a piece of social commentary as much as it does as a piece of art in its own right. I am personally drawn to art which has depth and encourages us to think about our actions in the contingent world. Consider the plight of those too afraid to be honest with themselves and the world for fear of the consequences portrayed in Last time my Lover came Inside me, ‘And the wife had warned him/ about the meremen that crept below the tide’ and those portrayed in Melusine Boys, ‘The bankmen, the office workers,/ doctors & lawyers/ have kissed their kids goodnight & come to find us.’

These poems then, pertain to the ongoing pains of attempted co-existence and the struggle for acceptance, and they do all this with a silky craftsmanship.

The book is available here.

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