Godefroy Dronsart – Interview

Godefroy Dronsart is a French poet and musician currently living in the Parisian suburbs and maintaining a sense of self-teaching British literature. His work has been published in various magazines such as the Belleville Park Pages, PostBLANK, Lunar Poetry, Paris Lit Up, and others. He is a former host and curator of the Poets Live reading series alongside Malik Crumpler. His first chapbook, The Manual, is available now from Sweat Drenched Press. Part of his musical work can be found on Bandcamp under the name Ozone Grass

Twitter: @OzoneGrass

Godefroy Dronsart, by Sabine DunDure

Godefroy, can you define poetry? What is it to you?

Hah, a banging question right off the start! I don’t think I can define poetry, but I can say what it means to me. I think poetry is the literary space in which langage can be as free as we want it to be. It’s the place where the text as space, the word as spell, the intimate voice and the formal experiment are all possible. I like the fact that in poetry you can shed any sense of expectation. You can do plot if you want, but you don’t have to, you can be lyrical, but you don’t have to. It’s very much a playground, a magic circle. Everytime a poet sits down to write they chart the outside of the little temenos of this moment. And the reader is invited to sit down within it and to stay as long as they want.

If I were describing your collection, The Manual, I might use words like challenging, innovative, and creative. To what extent do you agree or disagree with these?

They’re all good adjectives, so I would be a fool to disagree with them! I don’t know how challenging it is to the reader, but it certainly is for me. I found myself a bit silly when friends would ask me ‘Oh you’ve got a book out? Cool! What’s it about?’ and my answer would be ‘I don’t know.’ Or someone asked ‘Oh great your first chapbook! Is it poems?’, ‘I don’t know.’ It’s a challenging work to categorise because although for ease of use we can present it as a poetry chapbook, it’s very hybrid. I cannibalised bits and pieces from other poems and drafts but you can’t really take a piece out. It’s the same kind of book a manual is. In a way it’s not very creative – I took a manual I was reading through at the time for an electronic instrument and thought what if I wrote one of these – only the manual has no object? And then of course past the first pages and the well-known rhetoric of manual-writing I had to decide on what kind of text it would become and it ended up being this.

Poetry, or more broadly art, provides ample room for originality, such as yours – but I am interested to know how you see this piece of work. Where would you place this text in literary history?

Well it’s very much experimental and doesn’t try to follow any pre-existing artistic guideline. But I can’t escape the people who made my writing what it is. My spouse said she found it to be a very surrealist text. I’m in love with prety much all of modernism so she can’t be wrong about that. All I know is that I liked the idea enough to push through it in ten days before the submission deadline for the press I wanted to send it to closed! I remember Zak, the editor of Sweat Drenched Press, emphasised the comedy of the book. Other people called it part game part civil disobedience manifesto. I think it’s fascinating how it garners these different opinions.

Can you give the reader some background? What was the inspiration for this collection?

Well a friend of mine sent me the website of Sweat Drenched Press. They had a submission call closing in ten days for an experimental chapbook series. I had poems and ideas for chapbooks, but looking at SDP, I didn’t think it would fit their aesthetic. And I loved their strange aesthetic so I definitely wanted to submit something. I had just started to play around with a small drum synthesiser from Moog, which comes with a great user manual. So one sleepless night the idea came – write a manual, but it’s only about itself, but not really. I was also getting really interested in a subset of tabletop role-playing games called the OSR – Old School Revival, which used (among a lot of other things) a number of random tables to generate events, characters, plots, items. The last pages of The Manual come from this. I thought that as a reader, I often receive an aesthetic experience. But reading this synth manual, I wasn’t just passive or contemplative – the text talked to me directly. Do this, be warned about that. Try this. Now try this and study the difference. And I wondered how would an art book reproduce that. How do you shift the position of the reader. But this is not a new idea: gamebooks do it. If you’ve played a choose-your-own-adventure book, like Fighting Fantasy, you’ve engaged in an interactive narrative experience. I wanted to see if I could take lessons from these pop forms and use them in a very different artistic context.

I think that your work in The Manual has a definite self-awareness, is this intentional?

I would say so. The book presents itself as a book and does not want you to forget that you are holding a book. The artist for the cover, Reverse Brackets, said when he read it that it was a hypnosis spell. I liked that. I think part of the ambition I had was to write something that wouldn’t take you out of your surroundings, nothing escapist, but on the other hand which you slightly maybe change your view of the surrounding reality. Sounds like a load of pretentious bollocks said like this, but I’d be lying if I were to say that the book wasn’t influenced by magical procedures and occult culture.

What would you say to somebody who might dispute this being called poetry? Indeed, you go as far as to write, ‘The purpose of this book is purely educational and/ should not be mistaken for any artistic endeavour.’

Honestly, anyone who might dispute this being called poetry would have a great point. It’s more poetry than anything else, I think? But it’s not a book of poems. I don’t even know if it is a poem itself. Some parts are more recognisably poetic than others, some are not. It’s as close to poetry as an installation is to painting or sculpture, in a way. As for that quote, well, you probably should trust what the manual says. Why wouldn’t you? It’s a simple manual.

You have made brave language and form choices, but there are discernible, perhaps more traditional, poetic elements to be found with the text, I particularly like the lines, ‘The ghost of a voice’ and ‘With eyes opened or closed, mouth open or closed,/ stick your hands deep inside the carcass of a deer or a/ bull’. With this in mind, how would you encourage readers to approach this publication?

I don’t know how they should approach it, it would be grand if people were to approach my tiny and strange book at all! But you’re right, and that connects to the previous question. I had never written anything like this before, and I come from a background of writing poems. So I could not do without these moments. They’re much closer to traditional free verse, for sure. Prose is a cool way to connect the book to what it isn’t – a simple way of conveying information – but right now I can’t write without the inkling that language is at heart an incantation. And that can’t happen without verse in my opinion. As guidance though, I would offer the idea of treating the book like a book you found by accident. Can’t hurt to open it. It’s only a manual.

What was the last book/record you bought?

That’s a particularly well-timed question considering the shopping spree I just went on … The two new books I just received are Portable Darkness, an Aleister Crowley reader, and the Myth and Metamorphosis Anthology from Penteract Press. I’m becoming a massive fan of Penteract. They’re a small press with a vision and their vision nourishes me greatly. Last records I bought were the latest Ibibio Sound Machine album, Doko Mien, and a dungeon synth release from Gnoll, Mörk Borg. First one is a super-fun mixture of funk, disco, new wave and rock, while the second is an ominous electronic album. Got a massive wishlist on Bandcamp though …

Is there a correlation between your writing and your music?

Inevitably there is, but while in music I mainly deal with improvisation or semi-improvisation, I’m much more of a control freak in writing. I come from an academic background and that can often sabotage the view one has of one’s writing. But the original impulse is often very similar. Usually a first draft will happen with a line or two, and it’s these words that guide the rest of the poem, through sound and meaning. I’m starting to consider these drafts like sound design sessions : they’re not automatic writing, and I definitely edit as I write, but more and more I don’t sacralise the writing. Whatever came out can become a poem or maybe will help the growth of a second text later on. Maybe it’s just a bag of images I can draw from later.

What is next for Godefroy Dronsart?

A lot, I hope! I’ve got at least three more book ideas in the works. All of them are pretty conceptual, but since I dont write individual poems with a plan, I found that starting with a clear idea of the organisation of a manuscript helps to track progress and to have ideas boiling in the cerebral cauldron. I want to play more with the idea of gamebook poetry, to use the tools given by text treatment software to a broader extent, and just to read more, write more and submit more!

The Manual is available now.

Poetry Review: Martin Grey – The Pretty Boys of Gangster Town (Fly on the Wall Press)

Martin is an experienced and active Nottingham based poet and event organiser who performs extensively across the Midlands, the Edinburgh Fringe and Berlin, winning the 2018 Southwell Folk Festival Slam.

He has supported several nationally renowned poets, including Jess Green and Dominic Berry.

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In Bones, Grey writes, ‘Held hushed by her helplessness and the fear on her breath’. This is an evocative image that transports me, without hesitation, to a world I remember well from a previous life. This is truth. A tale of desperation, modern Britain one might say – ‘I don’t know how to be alone with her in the street-lit stillness’. Indeed, this poem makes me think about the shame of charity, ‘protect me from/ her pain and protect her from the cracks we let her fall/ through’.

Reading on then, Fish, Chips, Bread and Butter and a Cigarette – the first thing to note is the shape of the poem on the page and I cannot help but ask, what does it add? I hold that it endows the poem with something of a metronome, in that the text synchronises with breathing, in then out. With, ‘In my still-warm fish I’d taste his story’, Grey conjures up the everyday, and by extension, the everyman. This is deceptively simple. So many readers will be familiar with the bus-rides, the cinema visits. This could perhaps be described as an example of blue-collar poetry.

I Should Have Said Something makes for particularly painful reading. Questions are asked of us all, are we merely passive observers, or actors? It is said that the ‘only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing’ and this is encapsulated with the resigned eyes of the poet-speaker. What can we do? Rather, how can I make a difference now? Readers are vociferously compelled to step up to the plate and act – perhaps owing to the guilt that I carry personally, the final line, ‘I said nothing’ stings like hell.

If I can segue into the poem Focus, I will draw your attention to the line, ‘I’ll make a cup of tea first. Then I’ll focus.’ This is another intelligent poem, and the poet employs a more prosaic form, which expands on the theme at the centre, the meandering mind, ‘Does anyone like their kneecaps?’ – ‘I bet my housemate forgot to wash up again.’ Underlying this, is a darkness – fuelled by guilt and self-doubt and it bubbles to the surface intermittently throughout. This guilt is less concerned with the non-actions of the passive observer and more a sexual encounter, ‘I probably shouldn’t have kissed her […] she must have felt like she was trapped’.

Dancefloor stands out to me, for it speaks directly to men of a certain age, for whom music was everything. There is a nostalgia to be found in, ‘we’d always remember/ how to hit every note/ when we strum the air’, and this is advanced by the repeated wish that ‘Dave was here’. A poem about the unattainable then, that takes me to a simpler place and time, that brings forward the ghosts of lost friends. In short, this poem is incredibly powerful and evocative for a man like me.

In Museum, the ‘talk in depth about yesterdays’ continues and I am struck by the lines ‘in my bright rooms of empty displays/ I build your legacies on sorrow’. Time is important throughout this collection, but never more so than here where the text is concerned with, ‘yesterdays’, ‘tomorrow’, ‘future plans’ and ‘eternal spin’. I think it is particularly interesting how the poet uses the idea of the museum and all those connotations, ideas of preservation and our relationship with history and historiography. This is in no way accidental.

While Grey’s poetry is often lacking in lyricism, it retains a sense of character. This poetry, I feel, draws us closer to the poet, through memory and meagre flourishes – much like when a television detective shines a high-powered torch on a dark crime scene – Grey ensures that we only ever see what we need to, he gives us the focus he bemoans that he is lacking. In doing this, the poet’s words carry much more weight. This is poetry without frill, rather an enormous amount of skill.  

The collection is available here.

Poetry Review: Lydia Unsworth – Yield (Knives Forks And Spoons Press)

Lydia Unsworth is the author of two collections of poetry: Certain Manoeuvres (KFS, 2018) and Nostalgia for Bodies (Winner, 2018 Erbacce Poetry Prize), and two chapbooks. Her latest chapbook will be released by KFS Press in 2020. Recent work can be found in Ambit, para.text, Tears in the Fence, Banshee, Blackbox Manifold and others. Manchester / Amsterdam. Twitter: @lydiowanie

The collection begins with Outer Play – a prose poem, where the language does not exactly excite, but is incredibly effective. Unsworth writes of ‘day-to-day demands’, ‘rustling newspapers’ and ‘nameless patches of housewear’. Consider the semantic field of the everyday on show here – curtain/mirror/bedroom/cupboard/coats/home and compare that to the title of the poems and this throws up a juxtaposition of sorts. What this poem says about the collection that follows is telling, they are not esoteric texts, but they are intelligent and purposeful.

'Yield' by Lydia Unsworth (40 pages)

Beget Each Other is perhaps more poetic, ‘don’t tell the gods I left a mess, tell them to send more clothes’ and ‘We’re growing faster than wild roses’ show a different side of the writer. One that has a philosophical edge and a raw beauty, ‘It teaches us about… a life in time, about letting oneself go.’

In Quiet Ambition and Strengthen Spine, there appears to be a blending of the poet’s own voice and that of the poet speaker, ‘I want to want nothing’. This poem signals a rejection, of sorts, of societal expectations/external demands; although it ends with that dangerous feeling of hope that we can ‘go on being beautiful’.

Untangle seems to tackle, more overtly, the theme of womanhood that has bubbled just below the surface of these poems to this point, ‘This is not the average time it takes a/ person of my age to get their body off the floor.’ Gradually, the poems become more concerned with femininity, or rather the poet becomes less interested in tiptoeing about the issue. In Much Talk we have the killer lines, ‘No one else could make me sadder than a line of you’, and ‘If you drop your/ wife in a car park, spin her round three times, and make a run for it’. Weighty topics handled with genuine courage and humour.

In Seasoning, Unsworth offers witty and valuable life advice, ‘Take what you need, not what you want’. The poet’s attention here turns to body image and which could be said to continue the thread of femininity. This is something which appears to be at the centre of Goat, which states that, ‘It is only because I have a body that I am seen’.   

As concerned as Unsworth is with issues of femininity, sexuality and body image, her poems also deal with environmental issues, ‘Stay empty or/ you will be rendered so: stripped of atmosphere, bland as punishment.’ – ‘We’re pitching our tent and leaving no trace by the/ side of the water.’; and consumer culture, ‘Fashions change’ – ‘Plastic-wrapped humps of landfill sprout parks’. In Yield, Unsworth shows herself, repeatedly, to be a poet with a conscience and a sharp eye, able to focus on the foibles of society in a way that engages rather than preaches, while at the same time she offers up introspective work. It is perhaps her blunt honesty, and diffident wit that gives her work its authenticity. Unsworth is an exciting voice that deserves your attention.

Yield is available here.

Poetry Review: Serge Neptune – These Queer Merboys (Broken Sleep Books)

Serge   Neptune is a London-based merman, poet, and translator. He is a former Faber Academy student and his work has appeared, or is forthcoming, in Lighthouse, Banshee, Brittle Star, Ink Sweat & Tears and Strange Poetry.

These Queer Merboys by Serge Neptune is a poetry collection swept in by the tide, that surprises with beautiful and striking imagery right from the off, ‘the sky is a ceiling of white paper cuts’.

What I find most affecting about this hoard of poems is the how they are brimming with the writer’s honesty and bravery, perhaps most evident in the title poem, which puts forward the truth that, ‘bodies have uses   other than swimming/ if caught in fishnets   things could happen’.

One assumes that there is no more a positive assurance in this text than, ‘the scars left were many and they burned for days’. The themes of sexuality and maturation are at the forefront of everything the poet does here. However, they are handled carefully throughout, ‘When we come of age, she imposed on us the burden of beauty’ – which is only furthered by, ‘freedom made them rainbow-feathered birds/ that leap from rose to lily without a care.’

As a whole, the poems serve as a extended metaphor for the difficulties surrounding sexuality. Indeed, these mermen come forth from the water to the land as those in the LGBTQIA+ community come forth from the shadows into the light. It is then, a display of courage and strength and calls to question non-believers and oppressors. As an ally, I felt a severe discomfort reading the line, ‘The telly blasting SINNERS! SINNERS!’

This collection delivers as a piece of social commentary as much as it does as a piece of art in its own right. I am personally drawn to art which has depth and encourages us to think about our actions in the contingent world. Consider the plight of those too afraid to be honest with themselves and the world for fear of the consequences portrayed in Last time my Lover came Inside me, ‘And the wife had warned him/ about the meremen that crept below the tide’ and those portrayed in Melusine Boys, ‘The bankmen, the office workers,/ doctors & lawyers/ have kissed their kids goodnight & come to find us.’

These poems then, pertain to the ongoing pains of attempted co-existence and the struggle for acceptance, and they do all this with a silky craftsmanship.

The book is available here.

Poetry Review: Erik Fuhrer – Not Human Enough for the Census (Vegetarian Alcoholic Press)

Not Human Enough for the Census, by Erik Fuhrer is a poetry collection that dips into nightmares, netherworlds, and fantasies. However, there is a remarkable truth that shines through. The references to the uncanny are grounded in realism. Perhaps the text offers us escapism?

When I read, ‘mask of feathers’ and ‘my other face’ in the first poem of the collection, I noted how we are invited to look at the writings as something otherworldly perhaps, ‘not quite human’. Fuhrer goes as far as saying that the ‘world has ended already’. However, the lines, ‘a finger/ that I cut/ out from an origami flower/ with a stem that went on forever’ display an unrestrained beauty that is to be found throughout. This is edgy, prickly poetry. It is barbed, and filled with images akin to nightmares, ‘rat gnawing at/ the glass of your nightmare’.

Fuhrer is constantly shifting our attention across the page – in a rejection of form and structure that strengthens the otherworldliness. However, this is contrary to the images of ‘slugs/ and worms and apples/ and pears…’ By working with the grimy and earthy the poet roots their work, in the familiar, and this is only heightened by the polysyndeton.

We are encouraged to imagine. This is a collection that errs on the edge of normalcy, of the known and presents us with hugely evocative and unexplainable images, ‘now the tree that grows/ between my teeth/ is an infinitely splitting atom’

It would be remiss of me, to consider the collection without giving due consideration to the accompanying artwork by Kimberly Androlowicz, which is equally strong, striking, and evocative. Some of the images have the appearance of rudimental cave paintings. The pairing of artists is complimentary in both directions. The use of colour is bold, and raw, but definitely not amateur. Indeed, the images provide a landscape for these texts. I personally like to read poetry that has a sense of place, and though this poetry is at times unearthly, the landscapes ground it.

This has a feeling throughout that it is as much about creation, as it is about destruction. The work is as much about new beginnings, as it is about death and endings. This is perhaps, furthered in the poems that deal with splitting of carbon atoms and blood, ‘god is liquid in the tempest’.

If one is looking for commonalities between the poems, they are there. This is poetry that stimulates, and whisks you from striking image to striking image. Poetry about blood, and skin cells, about life and being. Prepare to be challenged. There is nothing ordinary about this work. These are poems ‘with holes/ without lungs/ without breath/ without body’.

There is a playfulness in shroom destruction; a waggishness that cuts through some of the difficult language and form. And, in a chanwinked spider, I find the beauty that I am looking for within a collection, and this is for me, the standout text, ‘in the swipe of/ glittering/ slips/ the wire/ onto my body/ as I/ sling/ the cockroach anthem/ to the wind’. Here, in this pithy text, the poet showcases all of their talents: surprising and creative language use; powerful, evocative imagery; and experimental form. That it is brief and perhaps mirrors my style of writing is not lost on me. We like what we like.

I think my favourite lines from the whole collection are the following, they display an attitude, that this poet is going to do things their own way, ‘the answer has the heart of a black hole/ leave it the fuck alone’. If I was going to make comparisons between poets, then there is certainly something of Stuart Buck here, in the otherworldliness and frankness of these texts.

thresholds is a fine example of poetry tiptoeing between the fantastic and the real. Certainly, it is, ‘a knitted masterpiece tucked beneath his ears that would usher in his demise/ as a human and resurrection as the world’s most realistic mannequin’.

The deeper into the text you wander, the more at home with it you become. By the time I reached, all filiation is imaginary, I had developed a relationship with the poetry that went beyond mere reading for purposes of review; I was reading it because I was enjoying it. Wholeheartedly! Indeed, there is a genuine, sparse beauty in, ‘becoming fish/ gilled heart/ gilded tongue/ a spider RANSACKING/ the/ web/ of/ my throat’. This collection from Fuhrer is certainly worth your time and attention.

This collection is available here.